I just got back from a really nice mini-vacation back to Tangshan for the Mid-Autumn festival. Our “Chinese Mama Baba” asked David and I to join them for this holiday that families typically spend together eating Moon Cake and telling stories. Unfortunately David had to work, but Ada and Liu joined me for a feast made by our favorite friends from Dongbei, China. In true parental form, our Chinese parents sent me back with about 10 extra lbs of food because they are worried we aren’t eating in Beijing!

The mid-autumn holiday is a really big event in China, and it was amazing to see how many people carried around red square bags filled with Moon Cake. Entire warehouses opened up for a week just to sell it! In fact, I went to the mall the day before the festival and the line for Haagen Daas brand cake stretched for what looked like six hours…so I took some photos! I find it interesting that despite the long tradition of eating moon cake (there are many different kinds, green tea, red bean, 5 nut, coconut, etc.) the most popular place to buy it is Haagen Daas; probably because they use ingredients like dark chocolate and marshmallow. The quality of the moon cake also shows how much you love/appreciate a person, and boxes of 6 at Haagen Daas started at 268 RMB and went up to over 600RMB! David’s work gave me my first moon cake, red bean, which you can see below. The decorations on top are usually intricate and very pretty. Although there are some flavors I don’t prefer, overall I like the cakes.

The next set of photos is from our elaborate good-bye dinner with all of the staff. In true Chinese form there were about 50 different kinds of dishes, and it was fun eating together one last time. Ada also took some great photos at the school for your viewing pleasure! One one of our last nights in Tangshan we had another dance off with the Uighurs, but this time in the middle of the sidewalk for all to see! We attracted quite a crowd to watch the show, and had a great time getting down to the traditional Uighur music. I also finally got some photos with my di gua (sweet potato) friend, who was always so patient and friendly in trying to understand my broken Chinese. She would always give me free potatoes when I passed, and enjoyed taking a firm grip of my arm to tell me I was strong and healthy. The food photos were taken on the food street where we ate most meals, including a jaozi (dumpling) feast made by the Dongbei Mama Baba before we left for Beijing.

And next up…the beach town of Beidaihe!

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